September302014
11PM
11PM
iamfitzwilliamdarcy:

salahare:

zemedelphos:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:


generalbriefing:


So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…


Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.


Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.
The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:  Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).  Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).  Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).  Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).  Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).  Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).  Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).  Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).  Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).  Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).  Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).  You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.
Link 

To expand on this, Jesus’s name is Anglicized in this way as well. We get Jesus from the Latin form of the Greek “Ἰησοῦς”(Iēsous), which is derived from the Herbrew “ישוע”(Yeshu’a, which meant “YHWH is Salvaion”, YHWH, or Yahweh being the name of God). When another form of that name, ” יְהוֹשֻׁעַ”(Yeoshu’a) was allowed to Anglicize through a different set of corruptions, it entered the English Language through Reformist Protestants as the name “Joshua”.Yes. Jesus’s actual name is Joshua.

I learned these from my Humanities teacher in college but the only thing that stuck with me three years later is that Peter=Rock aka Rocky. Peter was a big burly guy named Rocky.

Man, could you explain how Jesus also found apostles called Pedro, Juan, Jacobo, Diego/Santiago, Andres, Mateo, Felipe, etc in the Middle East. Like those are Spanish names????

iamfitzwilliamdarcy:

salahare:

zemedelphos:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:

generalbriefing:

So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…

Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.

Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.

The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:

Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).

Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).

Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).

Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).

Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).

Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).

Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).

Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).

Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).

Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).

Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).

You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.

Link 

To expand on this, Jesus’s name is Anglicized in this way as well. We get Jesus from the Latin form of the Greek “Ἰησοῦς”(Iēsous), which is derived from the Herbrew “ישוע”(Yeshu’a, which meant “YHWH is Salvaion”, YHWH, or Yahweh being the name of God). When another form of that name, ” יְהוֹשֻׁעַ”(Yeoshu’a) was allowed to Anglicize through a different set of corruptions, it entered the English Language through Reformist Protestants as the name “Joshua”.

Yes. Jesus’s actual name is Joshua.

I learned these from my Humanities teacher in college but the only thing that stuck with me three years later is that Peter=Rock aka Rocky. Peter was a big burly guy named Rocky.

Man, could you explain how Jesus also found apostles called Pedro, Juan, Jacobo, Diego/Santiago, Andres, Mateo, Felipe, etc in the Middle East. Like those are Spanish names????

(Source: stfueverything)

12AM
12AM

vermontprep:

Always reblog.

(Source: fifthharmony, via teenagemanpurse)

12AM

Who needs counseling when you have an amazing RD who loves and respects you and listens to you and gives you sisterly advice better than you could ever imagine?

Thank you God for putting Lesley on the Patton staff

September292014
3PM

Emperor’s New College

dj3y3:

tokyodoll13:

English Majors:

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Architecture Majors:

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Music Majors:

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Engineering Majors:

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Mathematics Majors:

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Theater Majors:

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Latin American Studies Majors:

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Linguistics Majors:

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History Majors:

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Religious Studies Majors:

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Law Students:

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Chemistry Majors:

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Women & Gender Studies Majors:

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Anthropology Majors:

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Sociology Majors:

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Philosophy Majors:

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Geology Majors:

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Economics Majors:

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Classics Majors:

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Government Majors:

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I fell apart at Government Majors

(via darcylewisinthetardis)

1PM
“Feeling beautiful has nothing to do with what you look like. I promise.” Emma Watson (via watsonlove)

(via okeeeyyy)

1PM
theraccolta:

Double Genuflection (Kneeling on both knees)
To receive blessings both during Mass and outside of Mass
during Confession
at the Te Deum (“Te ergo quæsumus, tuis fámulis súbveni”)
During the first strophe of the hymns Veni Creator Spriritus and Ave Maris Stella
at the words “Veni, sancte Spiritus” in the Alleluia before the Sequence on Pentecost Sunday and the Octave of Pentecost and in the votive Mass of the Holy Ghost
When the condition Coram Sanctissimo exists with the blessed sacrament exposed, it is done :
Outside liturgical functions/ Ex actu functionis: when leaving or coming to the view of the altar, in the center of the altar, passing it “at the side,”or before ascending and after descending from the predella (actual altar steps) 
During functions (e.g. Mass, Adoration and Benediction) or In actu functionis: Crossing the altar, coming or leaving the center to go to an outside point, on the sanctuary floor (in plano) before ascending, and after descending from the predella.

theraccolta:

Double Genuflection (Kneeling on both knees)

  • To receive blessings both during Mass and outside of Mass
  • during Confession
  • at the Te Deum (“Te ergo quæsumus, tuis fámulis súbveni”)
  • During the first strophe of the hymns Veni Creator Spriritus and Ave Maris Stella
  • at the words “Veni, sancte Spiritus” in the Alleluia before the Sequence on Pentecost Sunday and the Octave of Pentecost and in the votive Mass of the Holy Ghost

When the condition Coram Sanctissimo exists with the blessed sacrament exposed, it is done :

  • Outside liturgical functions/ Ex actu functionis: when leaving or coming to the view of the altar, in the center of the altar, passing it “at the side,”or before ascending and after descending from the predella (actual altar steps) 
  • During functions (e.g. Mass, Adoration and Benediction) or In actu functionis: Crossing the altar, coming or leaving the center to go to an outside point, on the sanctuary floor (in plano) before ascending, and after descending from the predella.

(via iheartbeingacatholic)

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